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Curriculum Subjects

This page outlines our different curriculum subjects,  our key purposes for learning within the subject, and when we might expect teaching for the subject to happen.

All staff timetable in the different subjects through the year, term and week in order to best fit the amount of curriculum content expected to be covered.

At key times of the year the regular curriculum may be affected by seasonal events and activities. Even at these times the change is just a different emphasis in some areas of the curriculum over others.

Reading

What are the key reading skills?

  • Ultimate purpose is reading for accuracy, fluency, context and meaning.
  • Using the experience of reading to inform and influence writing across the              curriculum.
  • Using the experience of reading to support speaking and listening.
  • The statements of the National Curriculum, or Early Learning Goals for EYFS,            are the basis of the skills and experiences for learning to read.
  • Coverage of the curriculum is detailed on the scheme of work and curriculum c        map.

 When does reading happen?

  • Children should experience reading daily which could be part of phonics,                  grammar, whole class reading, cross curriculum reading.
  • Children should experience specific reading instruction at least twice per week.
  • Children should be reading daily in different subjects.
  • Children should be reading daily at home.
  • In the Early Years children are expected to take a book/books home daily:                instructional phonics supported texts in additional to a picture book, that is            intended to be shared.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Phonics

  • Phonics is taught systematically using Letters and Sounds.
  • In EYFS and Key Stage 1 phonics is taught daily following the sequence in L&S
  • By the end of EYFS children should be ready to learn phase 5
  • Phase 3 and 4 are revisited and 5 is taught throughout Year 1 and revised at            the beginning of Year 2 when phase 6 is taught.
  • Pupils are taught the required spelling patterns for their year group.
  • No Nonsense Spelling supports teaching from Year 2 upwards.
  • The sessions are taught daily and phonics is supported in all areas of learning.

 Lessons follow the sequence of:

  • Revisit and review
  • Teach
  • Practice
  • Apply

Common exception words are included in the sessions.

SEND

When necessary, children have group or individual support to catch up.

Pupils in Key Stage 2 who are not working at the expected standard have group or      individual intervention.

Tracking and assessment.

At the end of each phase, or more frequently as required, a diagnostic assessment is carried out with individual pupils.

Children are assessed on single sounds; segmenting and blending; including real and alien words.

Evidence of application is shown in pupils’ writing books and dictated sentences or       words.

  Resources

  • Letters and Sounds is the primary resource which includes games and                      recommended activities.
  • Independent practice tasks can be carried out during others times of learning        (during guided reading for example) 
  • Visual resources: high frequency words on display, sound mats, Mnemonic                flash  cards (Read Write INC) 
  • Multi-sensory resources: sound table, letter formation cards, songs and games
  • Computing resources – Purple Mash, Hairy Letters, Espresso, Phonics Play,             Alpha Blocks

Writing

What are the key writing skills?

  • Ultimate purpose of writing is to communicate with written words
  • To write with grammatical accuracy, creativity and imagination
  • To recognise the purpose for writing and an awareness of audience
  • Using the experience of reading to inform and influence writing across the              curriculum
  • Using the experience of speaking and listening to orally rehearse writing
  • The statements of the National Curriculum, or Early Learning Goals for EYFS,            are the basis of the skills and experiences for learning to write.
  • Coverage of the curriculum is detailed on the scheme of work and curriculum          map.

 When does writing happen (and for how long)?

  • Children should experience writing daily as part of the whole curriculum
  • Skills for writing (grammar, spelling, phonics and handwriting)are taught                  discreetly and embedded in all writing across the curriculum
  • Grammar is taught at least once a week
  • Spelling/phonics is taught everyday
  • Handwriting is taught twice a week in KS1; at least once a week in KS2. SEND            pupils may have group sessions on a more regular basis. This could include              touch typing.
  • Children should be writing daily in different subjects.
  • Children should be consolidating writing skills in homework from Year 2 by                writing and learning spellings.
  • In the Early Years children are expected to mark make and develop confidence        in knowing that marks have meaning, children learn skills to prepare them for          writing like sounds and letters, pencil grip and some familiar words. Learning            through play, the pupils have the opportunity to experience writing for                      pleasure which is motivated by the activity -set up in the classroom and                  initiated by their own play.

KS1 and 2 will complete a piece of extended writing every week.

Maths

What are the key maths skills?

  • Rapid recall of basic fluency facts
  • Knowing a range of methods for computation
  • Being able to select the most efficient method
  • Being able to explain and reason using correct mathematical language
  • Being willing to have a go and learning from mistakes
  • To be accurate
  • Question answers and see when answers cannot be possible
  • Coverage of the curriculum is detailed on the scheme of work and curriculum          map.

What are the must do/givens/non-negotiables for maths, and/or where are they to be found?

  • The National Curriculum for Maths is the basis of the content of the maths              curriculum.
  • Teachers must teach in the mastery style (teach the whole class together,                moving in small steps so as to assure deep understanding) – not differentiated       (except for out-liers) but with star challenges, using the following schemes,               Power maths* books, White Rose resources and the NCETM website, all of                 which have been carefully chosen as they expect children to think, reason and         use links. We use nrich or other quality problems at least fortnightly to further         foster deep thinking
  • There must be a fluency lesson either as part of the lesson or as 10 minutes              stand alone 4x weekly (rapid recall of essential facts- supported by a school            based fluency book) –fluency tests x 1 weekly from Year 2
  • KS2 must teach X tables and test using the x factor sheets x 1 weekly, our                expectation is that 90% of children will be fluent in their tables (-12x) at the            end of year 4
  • A maths working wall must be on display in all classes and support current              learning.
  • Children must be expected to answer in sentences and become proficient at            explaining what they are doing and why?
  • Reasoning must be both built into lessons and bolt on
  • Children must correct their misconceptions as soon after the lesson as                      possible
  • Coverage of the curriculum is detailed on the scheme of work and curriculum          map.

 *Recognised and approved by NCETM, and supported by Maths Hub lead.

 When does maths happen (and for how long)?

Maths happens daily for between 30 and 90 minutes, but should total 4.5 hours per week minimum.

Religious Education

What are our key considerations for Religious Education?

  • Mapped in planning from the LDBS agreed syllabus and Early Learning Goals
  • Our current R.E. syllabus includes 2/3rd Christianity teaching, 1/3rd other faiths

Educate for life in all its fullness

  • Using Christian teaching to offer guidance to decision making.
  • To build religious literacy- knowledge, reflection and application.
  • Respect all faiths and those with none.
  • To be courageous advocates and to ‘shine as lights in the world’.
  • To be able to talk about our beliefs in an informed way.
  • Allow other to have their own faith and to be curious about others beliefs.
  • Offer a space for peace/reflection.

Science

What are the key science skills?

Enquiry skills:

  • Classifying and grouping Pupils make sense of how the world is organised. Identification is the process of using differences to name something and classification is organising things into groups. Opportunities to identify arise when pupils recognise not all birds are the same for example and can identify and name them. They can then use observable and behavioural similarities to group them and add new things
  • Observing changes over time This often involves outside work with plants/animals in their habitat or watching what happens when something is set up in classroom… carnations in coloured water, salt solution on a radiator.
  • Pattern seeking Pupils observe, measure and record events and systems when carrying out pattern seeking enquires. They also collect and interpret data from secondary sources. They make observations and conduct surveys where the variables can’t easily be controlled for practical or ethical reasons

                                    Do all leaves have..?

                                    Can people with longer legs run faster?

  • Research / Modelling Where the answer is found using secondary sources. This is usually where it is impossible or unsafe for pupils to answer with first hand enquiries. This enquiry helps them evaluate sources, distinguish between fact and opinion and recognise conflicting evidence and bias.

                            Direct children to a range of suitable secondary resources; specific                                pages in a book, finding answers to questions in watching video,                                      specific online searches.

                            Meet a friend and exchange news

  • Comparative and fair tests Helps pupils explore relationship between variables. Comparative tests children compare one event with another e.g. does the red car go faster than the green car? A fair test identifies the causal relationship between two variables. E.g. does the height of the ramp affect how quickly the toy car rolls down the ramp and everything else remains the same

 

Working scientifically.

  • Ask scientific questions,
  • Plan an enquiry/ perform simple tests
  • Make predictions
  • Observe closely
  • Measure accurately
  • Gather/ record results
  • Present and interpret results
  • Draw conclusions
  • Evaluate findings

Knowledge and understanding of the world.

Coverage of the curriculum is detailed on the scheme of work and                              curriculum map.

When does science happen (and for how long)?

  • Expectation of approximately 1.5 hours in KS1
  • Expectation of approximately 2 hours in KS2
  • Taught either as one block or 2 blocks over the week
  • Science may be covered in a trip relating to a topic e.g. habitats, Space-                  Greenwich Observatory
  • Science weeks/days- visits from external providers e.g. Crick Institute or Mr            Bubbles etc.

 

 

Computing

What are the key computing skills?

  • Having the confidence to explore technology.
  • Being able to use technology to efficiently organise and retrieve information.
  • Being able to choose the most appropriate piece of technology for a given              task.
  • Being able to use technology to create, edit and present content, which                    demonstrates excellence.
  • Being able to keep safe online.
  • Being able to use technology in a responsible manner.

Coverage of the curriculum is detailed on the scheme of work and curriculum          map.

When does computing happen (and for how long)?

  • Computing as a discreet subject is timetabled weekly for approximately 45              minutes.
  • Computing happens in class.
  • Computing may happen on a visit to the CLC for specific learning.
  • Computers/technology/Apps or programmes may be used to support and                deepen learning in any other curriculum subject.

Personal, Social, Health and Citizenship Education

What are the key PSHCE skills?

Emotional health.

  • loss and separation
  • Self-awareness
  • Emotions and feelings
  • Setting targets

Developing good relationships.

  • Conflict resolution
  • Friendships
  • Difference

Looking after our bodies.

  • Healthy eating
  • Drug education
  • Keeping fit
  • Changes at puberty and relationships

Environmental considerations.

  • Recycling
  • Sustainability
  • Animal welfare

Understanding a modern democracy.

Media and stereotypes.

British values and good citizenship.

Personal finances and shopping.

Rules and charters.

Coverage of the curriculum is detailed on the scheme of work and curriculum map.

When does PSHCE happen (and for how long)?

  • PSHCE lessons happen once per week for 45 minutes.
  • Planned for every half term for half termly or termly blocks (yearly curriculum        map and medium term planning).
  • In some cases units are taught as a block.
  • Some themes occur outside of PSHCE time as incidents happen especially                around relationships and friendships .
  • There is considerable overlap between the PSHCE curriculum, the RE                          curriculum  and the Collective Worship schedule.
  • Through secondary school transition activities.

Art

What are the key art skills?

  • Art.
    • Produce creative work
    • Explore ideas
    • Record experiences
    • Become proficient in drawing, painting, sculpture and other art, craft and           design
    • Evaluate and analyse creative works using the language of art, craft and            design
    • Know about great artists, craft makers and designers and understand the            development of art and craft through time/history
  • Coverage of the curriculum is detailed on the scheme of work and curriculum          map.

When does art and design happen (and for how long)?

  • In Reception daily.
  • KS1/KS2 One hour per week.
  • Three key topics are covered over the year mostly covered over a half term.
  • Some classes block units of work over a shorter period, but with longer                    sessions.
  • Through trips and visits to galleries.
  • Some years the school holds an art themed week.
  • At key times in the school calendar e.g. end of the Autumn term the school will        be involved in art based projects e.g. Christmas decorations, projects for the          fair, Christmas card design.
  • Art club after school.

 

 

Design Technology

What are the key design and technology skills?

Design & Technology.

  • Develop creative, technical and practical expertise to perform everyday                    tasks confidently to participate successfully in an increasingly                                    technological world
  • Build and apply a repertoire of knowledge, understanding and skills to                      design and make high –quality prototypes and products for a wide range of            uses
  • Critique, evaluate and test their ideas and products and the work of others.

 Cooking & Nutrition.

  • Understand and apply the principles of nutrition / healthy eating
  • Understand seasonality and know where and how a variety of ingredients                are reared, caught, processed
  • Practise and apply practical skills needed in food preparation and cooking
  • Cooking is a crucial life skill that enables pupils to feed themselves and                    others affordably now and in later life.

Coverage of the curriculum is detailed on the scheme of work and curriculum           map.

 When does design technology happen (and for how long)?

  • In Reception daily
  • KS1/KS2 One hour per week
  • Three key topics are covered over the year mostly covered over a half term
  • Some classes block units of work over a shorter period, but with longer                    sessions
  • Through trips and visits to museums
  • Some years the school holds a Design & Technology themed week
  • Coverage of the curriculum is detailed on the scheme of work and curriculum          map.

 

 

History

What are the key history skills?

  • Putting historical events or times in order- chronology.
  • Understanding the influence of history- local and global on life in modern                  Britain
  • Range and depth of historical knowledge.
  • Understanding how we learn about history-sources of evidence, accounts,                trips  and immersion, artefacts, fact/opinion, bias.
  • To be able to ask questions to develop understanding.
  • To be able to record and communicate our learning in history.
  • Coverage of the curriculum is detailed on the scheme of work and curriculum          map.

When does History happen (and for how long)?

  • Classes plan for approximately 2 history topics per year.
  • Geography and history curriculum alternate.
  • History lessons will last for approximately 1 hour per week.

Geography

What are the key geography skills?

  • Locational knowledge-where things are.
  • Place knowledge- similarities and difference between places.
  • Human and physical geography- human use of geography/land, natural                    features- rivers, mountains and the weather.
  • Geographical skills and fieldwork.
  • Vocabulary of geographical terminology.
  • Coverage of the curriculum is detailed on the scheme of work and curriculum          map.

 When does geography happen (and for how long)?

  • Classes plan for approximately 2 geography topics per year.
  • Geography and history curriculum alternate.
  • Geography lessons will last for approximately 1 hour per week.
  • Aspects of geography curriculum/geography learning are covered through              other topic work- e.g. Vikings and Romans, invaders and settlers, art based            landscape work, that could include where we go on holidays, settings of class          books and current events (This Week-newspapers), assembly.

Modern Foreign Language/ French

What are the key skills?

 

  • Oracy
  • Literacy
  • Intercultural understanding

Coverage of the curriculum is detailed on the scheme of work, curriculum map and medium term planning which can be found in the shared area, under French.

 

When does French happen (and for how long)?

  • KS2 approximately 40 minutes per week